Just What Is A Fighter-Bomber Pilot?

In my book “On Top of Everything”, I briefly mention that my father, Hugh W. Seton, was a fighter-bomber pilot in WW II and that he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Dad passed away in 1992 but I remember him sharing many stories about his experiences during the war. Arriving back at the airstrip only to find his aircraft littered with bullet holes. Using skip-bombs to break a hole into the wall of a fortress that held allied prisoner of war, and hearing that many successfully escaped. Flying toward a target at tree top level and at top speed in order to maintain the element of surprise. Or the night the squadron burned down the mess hall during a party.

It was only several years after his death, when I came across his flight log books, that I really took a deeper interest and began a long research project which taught me a lot. One of the things I learned was that there were fighter pilots. They flew the single engine fighter aircraft such as the Spitfire or the Mustang. Then there were the bomber pilots who flew the large, two or four engine bombers such as the Lancaster or Liberator. What I learned was that dad was a fighter-bomber pilot. These guys flew single engine dive bombers. Two aircraft my father flew were the Vultee Vengeance (1700 HP) and the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt (turbo-charged to 2500 HP). To put this into perspective, today’s average single engine aircraft operates using a 150 to 350 HP engine.

I will always remember how dad described being suspended in his harness as he dove straight down, and how highly he spoke of the Thunderbolt. It really was a well built aircraft. The Thunderbolt could reach speeds of 435 mph flying horizontally and could break the sound barrier in a dive. Known as the Jug because of its shape, it could take a real beating and still bring most of its pilots home safely. The Thunderbolt was a dive bomber but it was also a fighter that engaged in many a dog-fight. And that is why the men who flew them were called “fighter-bomber pilots”.

Dad flew 125 missions over enemy territory through 1944 and 1945. I can only imagine what it was like to have gone through that. He didn’t say much about the really bad times. For his contribution to our freedom and as an inspiration in my life, I will be eternally grateful.


Laurence Seton, P.Eng., PMP is the President of Projecteze Inc. and is the author of On Top Of Everything: Manage Your Projects & Life With Ease. He helps busy people learn the skills to get and stay organized and on top of everything at work, at home and at school using Projecteze: The Ultimate Organizational System. Follow Laurence on Twitter and Facebook.

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Professionals Bring Their Stress Home, Study Finds

More money, power make things worse

“First you get the money, then you get the power, then you get the problems at home.”

“Well-educated professionals, even those who have control over the hours they work, are likelier to say their jobs interfere with their personal lives. According to a new study, it's the stress of higher status."

A recent Globe & Mail article written by Siri Agrell describes a survey of 1,800 American workers conducted by Professor Scott Schieman, a sociology professor at the University of Toronto. The survey “When Work Interferes with Life: Work-Nonwork Interference and the Influence of Work-Related Demands and Resources” appeared in the December 2009 issue of the American Sociological Review.

The article by Agrell, with quotes from Howard Eisenberg (a Toronto-area psychologist), included the following statements:

  1. Well-educated professionals (those with college or postgraduate degrees), are more likely to say their jobs interfere with their personal lives - even those who have control over the hours they work.

  2. Job authority, skill level, decision-making latitude and personal earnings also predicted trouble outside of the office.

  3. Those who succeed at work seem to have it worse.

  4. Professionals with the most control over their own schedule had the highest levels of stress.

  5. BlackBerrys and other technology keep professionals constantly connected to the office, and the resulting pressure can lead to anger, depression, or drug or alcohol dependence.

  6. People who excel at their jobs are often incapable of switching off their work mode.

  7. The biggest mistake that people make in positions of leadership is not having a conscious strategy to leave your work problems at work and mentally carve out space for your personal life.

  8. It's usually a health scare that causes people to re-think their approach to work. The warning sign can also be a spouse saying they've had it.
It was items 6 and 7 above that really came close to home for me. The ability to leave work at work was one of the primary reasons I developed Projecteze: The Ultimate Organizational System. I needed a way to capture and keep track of everything I had to stay on top of during my busy days as a project manager. Projecteze allowed me to do that and, of equal importance, it allowed me to turn it all off when I left the office at the end of the day. Projecteze lets me free my mind of all of the work related details that would normally be circling in my head throughout the evening because I know everything is captured and waiting for me in my Projecteze table. I can let it all go. And it is especially helpful for people who have difficulty changing gears from the workplace to home.

I encourage you to try Projecteze for all of the reasons identified in Schieman’s survey and Agrell’s article. Don’t wait for a health scare or for your personal relationships to fall apart. Projecteze allows you to perform at the higher levels associated with succeeding in today’s world while also providing you with the ability to step away from it all when you go home at night or on the weekend. This provides more freedom and time for yourself and your family which, in turn, creates a more balanced and less stressful life.

If you are a busy professional and are experiencing any of the negative symptoms described in this article, you can make a conscious choice to change that. Everything you need is at www.ontopofeverything.com.

The complete Globe & Mail article can be found at: http://bit.ly/7zBHHm

Reference: “When Work Interferes with Life: Work-Nonwork Interference and the Influence of Work-Related Demands and Resources” (Scott Schieman, University of Toronto, Melissa A. Milkie, University of Maryland, and Paul Glavin, University of Toronto).


Laurence Seton, P.Eng., PMP is the President of Projecteze Inc. and is the author of On Top Of Everything: Manage Your Projects & Life With Ease. He helps busy people learn the skills to get and stay organized and on top of everything at work, at home and at school using Projecteze: The Ultimate Organizational System. Follow Laurence on Twitter and Facebook.

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Are You Setting Yourself Up For A Balanced Life

Time To Make A Choice

Even if 2009 was a particularly stressful year for you, you could choose to continue living your life in the same manner with the hope that someday it will all change. In effect, you are not choosing when you take this approach. Like the frog in a pot of water that gets increasingly warmer, the tendency might be to stay where you are because it’s something you’re familiar with. But this is the beginning of a new year and, if you’re not living the life you want, this is the perfect time to make a change.

What does it take to change this pattern and reduce those stress levels? Balance is usually a key factor....balance between work life and personal life, and it's being seen as more and more important by more and more people. If you want more balance in your life, the first thing you need to do is choose that, and then back it up with determination and focus. In this way, you will be defining and honoring your own personal boundaries. How many hours a week are you willing to devote to work? What is the minimum time commitment you want to have available for your family? Your friends? Your hobbies? Or any other personal endeavors that are important to you. How do you want to spend the time you have available?

By taking stock of where you are currently spending your time and comparing it to where you want to spend your time, you will see where you can make adjustments that will likely be personally very rewarding.

Fulfilling the commitment of earning an income so you can pay the bills may take up a good portion of your week. How you use your remaining time basically comes down an issue of time management. Being well organized is one of the best ways to get the most out of the time you do have. It provides many benefits. Being well organized enables you to prioritize what has to be done, fulfill your obligations and still carve time out of your week and year to devote to the things you want to have more of in your life.

Set up a system or adopt an existing system like Projecteze that can help you get and stay well organized so you can be more efficient with your time. Then consciously make the choice to include “me” time and “family” time in your week. Schedule them right into your week. Make the choice and take the steps to live the life you really want. This will bring more balance into your life and you're going to love the after effects.

Beyond the issue of getting and staying well organized, how well you define and honor your personal boundaries is the bigger and much more important issue. It really is the foundation for living the life you want.

If you’ve got a stack of papers sitting on your desk calling for your attention. I can almost guarantee that no matter how much of that stack you get through today or this week, there will always be more work to take its place. It’s great to impress everyone around by showing them how dedicated, efficient and valuable you are but all too often a penchant for continually taking on more can lead to higher stress levels, loss of balance and simply filling any time you do free up with more work.

Now, step away from the Smartphone, especially if you’re using it at the dinner table, and decide to make 2010 your most personally rewarding year ever.



Laurence Seton, P.Eng., PMP is the President of Projecteze Inc. and is the author of On Top Of Everything: Manage Your Projects & Life With Ease. He helps busy people learn the skills to get and stay organized and on top of everything at work, at home and at school using Projecteze: The Ultimate Organizational System. Follow Laurence on Twitter and Facebook.

Read more...

Is Projecteze For Me

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